GC final campaign 10x13-02

Goods Cycle: Rebel T-Shirts with a Cause

ABOUT

Rebellious clothes that don’t raise the f*cking sea level, but can raise your level of consciousness.

Everyone who buys our shirts is basically a hero.. because we save the lives of shirts before they get shipped off, trashed, or destroyed, and let them live a long, healthy life.

HOW:

We work with Goodwill to get TONS (yes, literally) of t-shirts that are practically new, and then we redesign them in true rogue fashion.

We believe waste is an amazing resource, and that too many clothes are thrown away each and every day (65lbs per person in America per year). So we channeled our rebellious side and came up with some edgy ways to talk about waste and second hand.

Every single shirt is unique in its own way because of our process. Our screen-printed slogans mingle with the previous art or text, reclaiming any design for your own.

WHY

Little Sh*rts don’t have a little impact…

2700 litres of water wasted

1.3 lb of pesticides/herbicides

>7lbs of CO2 emissions

*use per 1 new cotton tshirt”

 

INSTAGRAM: Goods.Cycle

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Goods Cycle pop up shop in Goodwill AtriumIMG_008526371858500_2512005708_bIMG_0097 LookbookIMG_0146IMG_0100Ad Campaign GC final campaign 10x13-02GC final campaign 10x13-01Postcardsfinal postcards GC-01final postcards GC-07final postcards GC-03final postcards GC-02Selected Lookbook Photos_DSC8077*_DSC8138*2_DSC8158*2_DSC8095*2_DSC7746*3

Robyn Willson, Junior Individualized Major

 

Progress- T-Shirt Redesign/Rebranding

This image includes a map of where this process would intersect Goodwill's typical process & goes into detail of each step with cost/time. Working out details.

This image includes a map of where this process would intersect Goodwill’s typical process & goes into detail of each step with cost/time. Working out details.

My sustainability project has morphed from creating a pop-up shop to creating an offshoot brand that saves and redesigns t-shirts that would otherwise be sold on the commodities market. This process increases the profit from an unsold shirt from a few cents to a possible 20-40$, depending on selling price.

Basics:

Screenprinting unsold tshirts with humorous, attention-grabbing slogans that promote used clothing as “cool”. This would capture shirts of many colors, sizes, and previous designs and create something new and cohesive with them. The audience should be 16-30 year olds unisex, middle income, probably urban/suburban. Like to make a statement.

First attempt at process of putting text on shirt

First attempt at process of putting text on shirt

Testing Natural & synthetic pigments on shirts. Yellow pigment from Sour Grass flowers

Testing Natural & synthetic pigments on shirts. Yellow pigment from Sour Grass flowers

Tshirts with varying color, fiber content, size, & previous decoration. Natural Pigments were nice, and held up well, but were less even, did not cover previous designs, and do not enable printing on darker shirts. Synthetic pigment thus a more sustainable process, allowing more shirts to be saved/redesigned.

Tshirts with varying color, fiber content, size, & previous decoration. Natural Pigments were nice, and held up well, but were less even, did not cover previous designs, and do not enable printing on darker shirts. Synthetic pigment thus a more sustainable process, allowing more shirts to be saved/redesigned.

1st Test. Natural Pigment.  Shirt design based off of parental advisory warnings.

1st Test. Natural Pigment.
Shirt design based off of parental advisory warnings.

Testing color differently; this looks more cohesive. Will limit number of screenprint colors for tshirt line to add consistency/brand identity

Testing color differently; this looks more cohesive. Will limit number of screenprint colors for tshirt line to add consistency/brand identity

Tshirt slogans will be edgy, humorous, attention-grabbing, appealing to audience between 16-30.

Tshirt slogans will be edgy, humorous, attention-grabbing, appealing to audience between 16-30.

Midterm Review – (Experiential) Branding

Created utilizing just 2 Goodwill t-shirts

Created utilizing just 2 Goodwill t-shirts

With cursory & secondary material tests on table and hung below my boards. Boards represent current direction

With cursory & secondary material tests on table and hung below my boards. Boards represent current direction

Images from pop-up shop, clothing store, and second-hand shop (left to right)

Images from pop-up shop, clothing store, and second-hand shop (left to right)

Close-up of upscale recycled product possibilities that could be made in-house or by partnering with local makers

Close-up of upscale recycled product possibilities that could be made in-house or by partnering with local makers

Focusing on Goodwill brand identity through materiality/products. Curating an experience exclusive to Goodwill; making the brand recognizable without its logo. Creating a more high-end experience, attempting to appeal to a wider customer base, including mid-high income (which has been hard to garner thus far in Goodwill’s history)

Feedback to work on (will mostly be research/information gathering):

1.Step-by-step implementation: What would that look like?

This question could currently have many answers because of the numerous components to my midterm project- I did not realize until review/feedback that I had so many disparate directions going on. From here, the main point is to narrow my scope and pick one goal: high-end pop-up shop, artist/designer collab to create one of a kind recycled goods,  logo/slogan work OR creating new paradigms of retail experience by expanding standard’s manual creating tactile brand identity. I will need to decide which has most potential for Goodwill and myself, and this will require research on how each might be implemented, and what the current paradigm & possible profit/output look like based on other company’s attempts.

2. Focus more closely on materiality implementation- take on the Goodwill standards manual. (Create materiality system to update current/future stores from supply chain cheaply/easily)

For this I need to research how other stores (ex. Aesop) have implemented basic materials to create extravagant experiences for the customer while connecting thoroughly to product (as display).  I will also focus on digging through other mid-high-end companies’ standards manuals to get cues on how Goodwill might add a materiality section. This will require me to research on/retrieval of some of the most common materials that Goodwill receives, to thoroughly connect the company’s main component: material recycling, to their stores.

Question for Audience: What are the most common materials Goodwill receives, specifically? (Must be goods that Goodwill anticipates they will continue to receive for the foreseeable future) Currently i’m focusing on possibilities with jeans, corrugated cardboard, and metal, but i’m not sure these are actually the most common? 

3. Think sustainably not only from a materials perspective, but from a business/financial perspective. How do you keep something like this going? 

This question is also very specific to the direction that I choose out of my multifaceted midterm, and was more geared towards the idea of a pop-up shop selling limited production goods made by/inspired by artist/designers. BUT, instead: Focusing on how to utilize materials from the Goodwill stream to change retail experience and increase profit will be where I start. This will require research into how to implement these materials (are they used whole? are they made into another material? will a designer/team need to be hired? Will the stores be able to implement this themselves? Will the interior design/installation/system be able to be maneuvered for future? How will this withstand time/trends? How would Goodwill create these potential products (ex. acoustic tiles or paper from denim)? How much would that cost and who would do the work? Could one process utilize many materials to create multiple outputs and lower costs? Would it be designed specifically for each individual store? Which stores would get it first? How does this affect customer experience/profit? Could this also turn into some kind of window display system that changes every few weeks or months like most fast fashion retailers? (Anthropologie is a great example)

This will require significant research into how other companies have curated retail experience re-designs, and would benefit from talking to someone from the Goodwill team.

Second Round of Iterations/Processes_ Robyn Willson

This week I focused on both creating new materials and creating an upscale brand logo for possible high-end Goodwill products. Not included here is my work with embossing natural and vegan leathers, or digital fabric printing, but both will be presented tomorrow at critique. I hope to push them much further throughout the semester and could use some support and knowledge (esp. with embossing). So far I have tried a few methods of embossing, with metal and linoleum forms, but all failed to have the definition/presence that I wanted. I have been talking to sculpture and metal majors and getting leads on how to get better results, and will more fervently pursue more professional embossing techniques when I get further with the logo/designs that will be used in this process. I am very interested in processes that are environmentally safe and easy to replicate.

I also want to make sure that by utilizing the Goodwill G logo, I am not stepping on any toes. I am not sure how far I can distort/manipulate/change a trademarked logo, even just for process work and experimentation, and would like to know the limitations here, if there are any. I would like the logo I create to fully reflect the brand identity while appealing to a higher end consumer (the customer Goodwill has had trouble getting). I would also like this logo (and whatever I use it on) to be directly related back to community benefits of Goodwill, such as the underutilized/under-publicized career center.

The “Slow Textiles” movement (and with this, handcraft) are very important to me as a creator; This is one of the myriad reasons that I have kept to more low-tech processes. I want to always make sure that I am engaging in processes that can be replicated by people without wealth and privileged technology; something that feels attainable to the masses, but in a polished form.

Trimmed Lino Block Process smaller

Block Printing/Branding

Block Printing/Branding

T-Shirt Yarn

T-Shirt Yarn