Midterm Review – (Experiential) Branding

Created utilizing just 2 Goodwill t-shirts

Created utilizing just 2 Goodwill t-shirts

With cursory & secondary material tests on table and hung below my boards. Boards represent current direction

With cursory & secondary material tests on table and hung below my boards. Boards represent current direction

Images from pop-up shop, clothing store, and second-hand shop (left to right)

Images from pop-up shop, clothing store, and second-hand shop (left to right)

Close-up of upscale recycled product possibilities that could be made in-house or by partnering with local makers

Close-up of upscale recycled product possibilities that could be made in-house or by partnering with local makers

Focusing on Goodwill brand identity through materiality/products. Curating an experience exclusive to Goodwill; making the brand recognizable without its logo. Creating a more high-end experience, attempting to appeal to a wider customer base, including mid-high income (which has been hard to garner thus far in Goodwill’s history)

Feedback to work on (will mostly be research/information gathering):

1.Step-by-step implementation: What would that look like?

This question could currently have many answers because of the numerous components to my midterm project- I did not realize until review/feedback that I had so many disparate directions going on. From here, the main point is to narrow my scope and pick one goal: high-end pop-up shop, artist/designer collab to create one of a kind recycled goods,  logo/slogan work OR creating new paradigms of retail experience by expanding standard’s manual creating tactile brand identity. I will need to decide which has most potential for Goodwill and myself, and this will require research on how each might be implemented, and what the current paradigm & possible profit/output look like based on other company’s attempts.

2. Focus more closely on materiality implementation- take on the Goodwill standards manual. (Create materiality system to update current/future stores from supply chain cheaply/easily)

For this I need to research how other stores (ex. Aesop) have implemented basic materials to create extravagant experiences for the customer while connecting thoroughly to product (as display).  I will also focus on digging through other mid-high-end companies’ standards manuals to get cues on how Goodwill might add a materiality section. This will require me to research on/retrieval of some of the most common materials that Goodwill receives, to thoroughly connect the company’s main component: material recycling, to their stores.

Question for Audience: What are the most common materials Goodwill receives, specifically? (Must be goods that Goodwill anticipates they will continue to receive for the foreseeable future) Currently i’m focusing on possibilities with jeans, corrugated cardboard, and metal, but i’m not sure these are actually the most common? 

3. Think sustainably not only from a materials perspective, but from a business/financial perspective. How do you keep something like this going? 

This question is also very specific to the direction that I choose out of my multifaceted midterm, and was more geared towards the idea of a pop-up shop selling limited production goods made by/inspired by artist/designers. BUT, instead: Focusing on how to utilize materials from the Goodwill stream to change retail experience and increase profit will be where I start. This will require research into how to implement these materials (are they used whole? are they made into another material? will a designer/team need to be hired? Will the stores be able to implement this themselves? Will the interior design/installation/system be able to be maneuvered for future? How will this withstand time/trends? How would Goodwill create these potential products (ex. acoustic tiles or paper from denim)? How much would that cost and who would do the work? Could one process utilize many materials to create multiple outputs and lower costs? Would it be designed specifically for each individual store? Which stores would get it first? How does this affect customer experience/profit? Could this also turn into some kind of window display system that changes every few weeks or months like most fast fashion retailers? (Anthropologie is a great example)

This will require significant research into how other companies have curated retail experience re-designs, and would benefit from talking to someone from the Goodwill team.